About The Breed

The intention of setting breeding standards is to establish the measurements by which breed quality can be judged. By doing so, consistency and quality can be assured for the breed, and set a universal standard globally and provide a baseline for the judging of a breed.

A responsible breeder and judge has the duty to ensure that any conditions that may have a detrimental effect on animal health and welfare, along with the consistency of the breed. As part of this responsibility, steps must be taken to ensure that such defects are not continued within breeding.

A failure to adhere to these standards should be seen as a deficit. The severity of the deficit should be measured against its effect upon the health and safety of the animal and any effect it may have on the dog’s ability to perform.

Brief History:

The breed of German Pinscher originates from Germany, recognized since 1879, and suffered a bout of near extinction. Thanks to the efforts of Herr Werner Jung after World War II, the breed now has sustainable numbers. After a report of no litters of the German Smooth Haired Pinscher was recorded from 1949 to 1957, he re-bred the animals into existence from larger framed miniature Pinschers and a purebred bitch. To date, all German pinschers originate from this original mother. The breed was inaugurated into the United Kennel Club in 1991.

Physical Characteristics:

This breed tends to be playful and easy natured. This breed is considered a working animal. As such, animals that may have marks or scars from labor will not be considered detraction from the appearance of the dog and will not suffer judicial penalty.

Appearance:

The breed is noted for it’s lean, powerful appearance, sturdily built frame and medium size. The posture is graceful and poised.


Head:

The dog has a triangular shaped head. It is long but does not have a prominent shape to the back of the head. The general scale of the breed, from the end of the tail to the upper back is about 1:2.

Faults:

  • May exhibit Snippiness.
  • The upper bout of the muzzle is aligned with
  • The forehead and is considerably deep.
  • The nose is black, however if the dog
    is light brown or another shade
  • Such as reddish or blue, the nose may
    match the color. Lips will be dark in color.

Teeth:

The teeth should be 42 in number and present a strong, scissor-like bite. The composition of the teeth should be six upper and six lower incisors, two upper canines as well as lower, eight premolar in the upper position and eight in the lower. The molars should present six lower teeth and four in the upper position.

Faults:

  • Premolars or molars may be absent.

Ear:

The ears rest higher on the head, and may be cropped or uncropped. If cropped, they are equally cut to two-thirds of the original length. If uncropped, they are v- shaped and sit close to the base of the head.


Eyes:

The eyes are an oval in shape and dark in color. They are about medium in size and are forward facing. Eyelids fit against the profile well.


Neck:

The neck is firm and graceful with a well-defined arch at the base of the neck. The skin of the neck is taut and free from any sort of dewlap or hangs.

Faults:

  • The neck may be too stout or stunted.

Body:

The size of the body should be close and paired. The overall length should be uniform to the height and measured at the withers of the back.

The dog’s chest should be flat ribbed and decently wide. The fore chest should extend just beyond the shoulder point and the brisket should travel below the elbows. The back is diminutive and has a rise over the loin area.

Forequarters: Shoulders should sit back with level muscle. The forelegs should sit straight and the elbows should sit narrowly to the body.
Hindquarters: The hindquarters should sit inline and have good length. The upper thigh Sits at an angle and is firm and strong. The stifle is long and has a good bend. The hocks should be not have a turn to them.


Feet:

The feet should be arched and small in size with feline characteristics. The nails and pads are dark and there should be no turning of the feet in either direction.


Tail:

The tail sits between the lower back and is carried upward.


Color:

The dog varies in color from a fawn to a reddish color. Dogs may present two-tone colors as well, such as red to tan or blue with tan and red marks. Red and tan are preferable. Marks are present at the cheeks and lips and above the eyes. Markings are also present at the throat area and as two triangular shapes on the chest, in the metatarsal area and other parts of the feet and forelegs. The markings are also present at the inner hind leg and vent. A solid white spot anywhere on the body is seen as a serious blemish.


Size:

The dog’s height at withers should measure between 17 and 20 inches.


Moment and posture:

The dog should exhibit a well-balanced and energetic movement with defined rotational action from behind. Posture is sequenced in a diagonal pattern from the top of the shoulder. The legs should sit straight and have no outward lean.

Faults:

  • Hackney movement.

A Note on Faults:

If the dog exhibits a deviation from the guidelines listed above, it will constitute a fault. As stated prior, the severity of the fault is correlated to the amount of deviation.
Disqualifications:

A disqualification is an automatic removal from placement in an event measuring conformity and is required to be reported to UKC in the event thereof. Disqualifications include aggressiveness or standoffishness. Crypotchid in unilateral or bilateral conditions, and undershot bite and albinism will also fail the dog to qualify.


Disqualifications:

A disqualification is an automatic removal from placement in an event measuring conformity and is required to be reported to UKC in the event thereof. Disqualifications include aggressiveness or standoffishness. Crypotchid in unilateral or bilateral conditions, and undershot bite and albinism will also fail the dog to qualify.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *